Combined vector, FFT and matrix accelerator plug-in module delivers increased performance for data analysis applications

DSP Development Corporation (Newton, MA) announces DADiSP/ProPac: a combined maths accelerator plug-in module for DADiSP, the engineering spreadsheet designed specifically for technical data analysis.

DADiSP/ProPac combines the new VectorXL module with the previously released FFTXL and MatrixXL modules to provide a single, optimised numeric processing engine.

DADiSP/VectorXL accelerates common vector maths computations by using the Intel® Math Kernel Library (Intel® MKL). Speed improvements of 20- to 60 per cent are common. The MKL Library provides highly optimised vector routines based on the VML Vector Math Library. The algorithms are specifically tuned to Intel processors to provide enhanced performance.

The DADiSP/FFTXL plug-in module automatically accelerates FFT computations and FFT based analysis routines. Also based on MKL, FFTXL takes advantage of the latest instruction sets, parallelism and algorithms to yield a highly optimised FFT function. Performance gains of 2- to 10x over the standard built-in FFT function are achieved to benefit new and existing FFT analysis applications.

The DADiSP/MatrixXL Module builds upon LAPACK, Linear Algebra PACKage provided by Intel® MKL to accelerate core matrix computations. LAPACK is an industry standard software library that provides a number of matrix routines including functions to solve linear equations, least squares systems, eigenvalue and singular value decomposition problems. By exploiting the processor tuned performance of Intel® MKL LAPACK, MatrixXL delivers speed increases of 3- to 50x over the standard built-in matrix functions.

“DADiSP/ProPac delivers the combined benefits of VectorXL, FFTXL and MatrixXL in one simple package to provided highly optimised numeric analysis capabilities to DADiSP users in a transparent manner” said Randy Race, DSP’s Chief Technical Officer. “Fast and highly tuned computing algorithms, once limited to the domain of specialty programmers, are now available to scientists and engineers across a broad spectrum of applications.”

Key features 

  • Simple deployment – just Install and Run.
  • 20- to 5,000 per cent speed improvements.
  • Optimised performance on Intel Processors.
  • Multi-threaded execution for even faster execution on multi-core systems.
  • Speeds up virtually any numeric analysis.

DADiSP/ProPac is compatible with DADiSP 6.5 and requires no changes to existing analysis routines.

The DADiSP range of products, including a choice of optional extensions, is supplied and supported by Adept Scientific in the UK, Ireland, Germany and Austria.

With offices in the UK, Germany and throughout the Nordic region, Adept Scientific is one of the world’s leading suppliers of software and hardware products for research, scientific, engineering and technical applications on desktop computers. Full details and contact information for all Adept Scientific international offices are available at http://www.adeptscience.co.uk; or telephone +44 (0) 203 695 7810.

DSP Development Corporation announces DADiSP® 6.5

Enhanced computation, plotting, algorithm development and integrated MATLAB® code execution simplifies complex data analysis tasks.

DADiSP 6.5, the newest release of the engineering spreadsheet designed specifically for technical data analysis from DSP Development Corporation (Newton, MA) is now available from Adept Scientific (Letchworth, Herts).

DADiSP 6.5 supports the processing of multi-channel data displayed in a familiar stripchart recorder plot. Calculations on a stripchart extend to each trace and automatically produce a corresponding output stripchart. Properties such as trace colour, axis placement and colour attributes are easily specified. By providing a ‘one to many’ calculation environment stripchart processing can greatly simplify the task of multi-channel data analysis.

DADiSP 6.5 adds seamless execution of MATLAB code directly from DADiSP. DADiSP 6.5 processes any built-in or custom MATLAB function or script just as if it were a native DADiSP function. MATLAB and DADiSP functions and data can be freely mixed. DADiSP 6.5 automatically plots series and array results from MATLAB in a DADiSP Window. MATLAB code embedded into a Worksheet Window formula is hot-linked and automatically re-calculates in response to source data changes.

DADiSP 6.5 extends DADiSP’s Series Processing Language to support both function and file based static and global variables. A new form based custom dialogue box facility enables the inclusion of GUI specifications and related SPL functions in one combined file. An integrated GUI based debugger simplifies the development of custom SPL functions. SPL’s C/C++ syntax offers a familiar and clean programming style allowing users to create custom routines using standard programming techniques.

Additional features include mouse based visual data editing, enhanced shape and text annotations with a programmable object-handle interface, .NET and ActiveX event handling and expanded on line documentation.

DADiSP 6.5 also adds over 100 new built-in and SPL routines spanning the areas of matrix and series manipulation, signal processing, maths, colour, series generation, curve fitting and statistics. “DADiSP 6.5 now offers over 1,000 analysis routines with an intuitive and familiar user interface to provide one of the most comprehensive data analysis tools available today,” said Randy Race, DSP’s Chief Technical Officer. “DADiSP is used by tens of thousands of scientists and engineers worldwide as a high productivity alternative to traditional spreadsheets, FORTRAN, C/C++ and MATLAB programming.”

The DADiSP range of products, including a choice of optional extensions, is supplied and supported by Adept Scientific in the UK, Ireland, Germany, Austria, Scandinavia and Nordic countries.

With offices in the UK, Germany and throughout the Nordic region, Adept Scientific is one of the world’s leading suppliers of software and hardware products for research, scientific, engineering and technical applications on desktop computers. Full details and contact information for all Adept Scientific international offices are available at www.adeptscience.com; or telephone +44 (0) 203 695 7810.

Embed DADiSP functionality into standalone applications with new DADiSP Application Builder

Adept Scientific plc (Letchworth, Herts) announces the DADiSP Application Builder from DSP Development Corporation (Newton, Massachusetts).

The DADiSP Application Builder, or DAB, is a redistributable component form of DADiSP that allows users to embed DADiSP functionality into their own standalone applications. The component operates as a standard ActiveX control compatible with almost any Windows based application framework.

By separating DADiSP functionality into a standard component, users can select their tools of choice (VB, VB.NET, C++, C#, etc.) to build their application and have that application seamlessly make use of DADiSP’s analytical and/or graphical capabilities. This allows developers to simultaneously leverage their knowledge of DADiSP and preferred application framework.

A ‘one-time’ licence for each development machine enables total distribution to any application with no further fees or royalties. A callable install program is included to provide a single, integrated installation strategy for target application deployment.

Competitive Advantage

DAB offers a number of key features and differs from competing products in several important ways:

  • Much smaller deployment footprint, about 3MB compared to over 70MB for other vendor offerings.
  • Fast native code implementation – no slow Java virtual machine overhead.
  • Works with any framework; use familiar and powerful Microsoft tools specialised to build GUIs, not cumbersome vendor specific implementations.
  • No custom compilers or link libraries required, users choose their preferred development tool.
  • Inherent support for large data files.
  • All features of DADiSP are still available including Worksheets, custom dialogues, SPLs and DLLs.
  • Leverages existing DADiSP knowledge for analytics and graphical manipulation.
  • Fast and simple application deployment.

DADiSP is a full-featured data analysis and visualisation environment designed to meet the demanding data analysis needs of scientists and engineers. Its highly graphical user interface features interrelated, ‘live’ graphical windows which update automatically when a variable is changed. DADiSP automatically captures data from laboratory instruments and test and measurement equipment and is compatible with data from a wide range of Windows applications.

The DADiSP range of products, including a choice of optional extensions, is supplied and supported by Adept Scientific in the UK, Ireland, Germany, Austria, Scandinavia and Nordic countries.

With offices in the UK, USA, Germany and throughout the Nordic region, Adept Scientific is one of the world’s leading suppliers of software and hardware products for research, scientific, engineering and technical applications on desktop computers.

New Version of DADiSP/WAV Audio Module

DADiSP/WAV Version 2.0 offers new streamlined interface and new features for digital audio data editing

Adept Scientific (Letchworth, Herts) announces a new version of the DADiSP/WAV audio module, an add-on to the popular DADiSP graphical data analysis application for handling digital audio data. A new, streamlined interface, direct integration with Windows Media Player, automatic waveform scaling and both standard and user-defined quantisation and format – these new features combine to extend the functionality and improve the speed of audio data handling in DADiSP.

DADiSP/WAV allows the user to read, write and edit digital audio data from .WAV format files via easy-to-use pop-up menus or simple one line functions. The DADiSP/WAV module supports standard PCM .WAV file format for 8 and 16 bit mono and stereo data files, giving users the flexibility to work directly with their data and take full advantage of the .WAV file format.

DADiSP/WAV Version 2.0 includes a completely redesigned user interface to streamline the process of creating, reading, writing and playing PCM .WAV files. At a click, waveforms from any DADiSP Window can be played directly with Windows Media Player or any other .WAV compatible application. The data is automatically scaled to provide optimal signal to noise ratio.

Series can be quantised to standard 8 bit and 16 bit resolution or user determined quantisation, and the bit format can be specified for custom applications.

DADiSP, from DSP Development Corporation (Newton, Massachusetts), is a full-featured data analysis and visualisation environment designed to meet the demanding data analysis needs of scientists and engineers. Its highly graphical user interface features interrelated, “live” graphical windows which update automatically when a variable is changed. DADiSP automatically captures data from laboratory instruments and test and measurement equipment, and is compatible with data from a wide range of Windows applications.

The DADiSP range of products, including a choice of optional extensions, is supplied and supported by Adept Scientific.

With offices in the UK, USA, Germany and throughout the Nordic region, Adept Scientific is one of the world’s leading suppliers of software and hardware products for research, scientific, engineering and technical applications on desktop computers.

New Data Import Module for DADiSP

Analyse bigger and more complex data sets with latest version of data import add-on for popular graphical data analysis software.

Adept Scientific (Letchworth, Herts.) announces a significant new version of the standalone data import module for the popular DADiSP graphical data analysis program. New DADiMP 5.0 extends DADiSP‘s importing capabilities, allowing users to import data files with sophisticated formats.

DADiMP 5.0 can import ASCII or Binary data files directly into DADiSP’s Labbook data structure without actually running the DADiSP program. DADiSP’s header formats and keywords are fully supported. Because DADiMP can run separately and remotely, for example on a separate data collection computer, DADiMP lets users automate, speed up and simplify data collection operations.

Previous versions of DADiMP limited the total file size to 2GB. DADiMP 5.0 uses a 64-bit file index to enable handling of very large files. Now the total file size is essentially unlimited (in the terabytes), and each individual series within the total file can be up to 2GB.

DADiSP, from DSP Development Corporation (Newton, Massachusetts), is a full-featured data analysis and visualisation environment designed to meet the demanding data analysis needs of scientists and engineers. Its highly graphical user interface features interrelated, “live” graphical windows which update automatically when a variable is changed. DADiSP automatically captures data from laboratory instruments and test and measurement equipment, and is compatible with data from a wide range of Windows applications.

The DADiSP range of products is supplied and supported by Adept Scientific.

With offices in the UK, USA, Germany and throughout the Nordic region, Adept Scientific is one of the world’s leading suppliers of software and hardware products for research, scientific, engineering and technical applications on desktop computers.

DATAQ Instruments File Import for DADiSP DATAQ

New module for importing datafiles from DATAQ data acquisition instruments into DADiSP graphical analysis, manipulation and presentation software

Adept Scientific (Letchworth, Herts) announces a new module for the DADiSP graphical data analysis application that allows Dataq Instruments WDQ files to be imported for manipulation, analysis and presentation of scientific and technical data using DADiSP’s powerful, interactive graphics capabilities.

DADiSP/Dataq File is a simple dialogue-based module designed to easily read and write WDQ data files created by Dataq data conversion hardware and software. Data input and output are buffered, enabling fast processing of WDQ files of any size and any number of channels.

Importing a WDQ file into DADiSP is as simple as pressing a button and selecting the file. After you’ve chosen a file (which can be of any size and contain any number of channels), a summary of the contents is displayed. The Dataq File module automatically reads all the channels in the WDQ file and optionally scales the data and sets the sample rate and engineering units. Data can be converted to original engineering units or imported as raw A/D counts.

The data channels are transposed on the fly to take advantage of DADiSP‘s optimized column orientation. Each channel can be loaded into a separate DADiSP window, or several can be combined and displayed in a single window.

The module can also save one or more DADiSP series to a WDQ data file. Sample rate, engineering units and conversion parameters are automatically included. Each DADiSP series can be autoscaled to make use of the maximum output resolution or a specific input A/D range can be specified to facilitate use with a specific A/D converter.

DADiSP, from DSP Development Corporation (Newton, Massachusetts) is an interactive graphics worksheet – a visually oriented software package for the display, management, analysis and presentation of scientific and technical data. Its highly graphical user interface features interrelated “live” graphical windows, manipulated by simple pull-down menus, dialogue boxes and point-and-click operation.

DADiSP automatically captures data generated by most laboratory instruments and test and measurement equipment, and supports ActiveX as both client and server, making it compatible with data from a wide range of Windows applications. Other DADiSP modules are available to import binary and ASCII data, COMTRADE files and MATLAB files.

Designed to meet the demanding data analysis needs of scientists and engineers, DADiSP is a full-featured data analysis and visualisation environment designed around a generalised data construct called a data series which can represent anything from a time domain radar signal to a medical image, and includes important attributes about the data. Analogous to a “graphical spreadsheet” for the analysis of very large technical data sets, DADiSP presents the data in multiple graphical windows which update automatically when a variable is changed.

The DADiSP range of products is supplied and supported by Adept Scientific.

With offices in the UK, USA, Germany and throughout the Nordic region, Adept Scientific is one of the world’s leading suppliers of software and hardware products for research, scientific, engineering and technical applications on desktop computers.

MATLAB File Import for DADiSP

New module allows DADiSP users to import MATLAB data into DADiSP for graphical analysis, manipulation and presentation

Adept Scientific (Letchworth, Herts) announces a brand-new module for the DADiSP graphical data analysis application that allows MATLAB files to be imported for manipulation, analysis and presentation of scientific and technical data using DADiSP’s powerful, interactive graphics capabilities.

The new DADiSP/MAT File is a simple, dialogue-based module that loads MATLAB .MAT data files (version 4.0 and higher) of any size and containing any number of variables into DADiSP. You can import the entire contents of the file, or select a sub-set of specific variables. The software will handle both Real and Complex Arrays; 1×1 arrays can be imported as scalars; and array variables can be plotted automatically. String variables are supported, and structures and cells are imported as global variables. With this new module, DADiSP users can work with MATLAB files without having MATLAB itself installed on their computer.

DADiSP, from DSP Development Corporation (Newton, Massachusetts) is an interactive graphics worksheet – a visually oriented software package for the display, management, analysis and presentation of scientific and technical data. Its highly graphical user interface features interrelated “live” graphical windows, manipulated by simple pull-down menus, dialogue boxes and point-and-click operation.

Like MATLAB, DADiSP is designed to meet the demanding data analysis needs of scientists and engineers. But while MATLAB is a matrix-based programming language, DADiSP is a full-featured data analysis and visualisation environment designed around a more generalized data construct called a data series which can represent anything from a time domain radar signal to a medical image, and includes important attributes about the data.

In short, MATLAB is essentially an interpreted programming environment, somewhat analogous to Visual Basic with technical data analysis capability. DADiSP is more like a spreadsheet, a non-programming core methodology that includes a programming language (SPS), similar to the combination of Excel and Visual Basic. Able to handle even the largest data sets, DADiSP presents the data in multiple graphical windows which, rather like the cells of a spreadsheet, update automatically when a variable is changed.

DADiSP provides a visual and intuitive method of handling technical data, and this new ability to use MATLAB data files makes it a viable alternative for engineers, scientists and other technical users.

The DADiSP range of products is supplied and supported by Adept Scientific. With offices in the UK, USA, Germany and throughout the Nordic region, Adept Scientific is one of the world’s leading suppliers of software and hardware products for research, scientific, engineering and technical applications on desktop computers. Full details and contact information for all Adept Scientific international offices are available at www.adeptscience.com; or telephone +44 (0) 203 695 7810.

With offices in the UK, USA, Germany and throughout the Nordic region, Adept Scientific is one of the world’s leading suppliers of software and hardware products for research, scientific, engineering and technical applications on desktop computers.

DADiSP helps the New York Medical College investigate and research human speech disorders

Historically, human speech disorders have often been attributed to psychological rather than physical causes. Until recently, technological limitations prevented thorough investigation of such pathologies as stuttering and spasmodic dysphonia. Dr. Rick Roark and colleagues at the New York Medical College are using a PC-based computer system to gain an understanding of the function of the human central nervous system in normal and pathologic speech production in order to sort out the psychological and physiological aspects of speech problems. The team has had to solve many tough technical problems in order to do so.

It is difficult to choose instrumentation for a laboratory in any health science field because such research is characterised by huge data sets, complex quantitative measures, and invasive physiologic data acquired from human subjects. Large data sets slow down analysis. Complex data extraction and analysis use a great deal of computer power, resulting in skyrocketing research costs. Data are difficult to reacquire if the first set isn’t sufficient. Measuring the body’s many movements in speech and analysing their interactions is difficult, but it is the best way to get an accurate assessment of a problem. By using ingenious measurement techniques on human volunteers and analysing the resulting gigabytes of data in custom PC computer programs, Dr. Roark and colleagues are creating a picture of a long-misunderstood ailment. Their research requires an acquisition, data management, display, and analysis system that can perform complex, multi-dimensional data extraction tasks even when data are acquired by diverse instruments at several different sampling rates. The team’s software must be flexible, user-friendly, and backed up by superior technical support.

Dr. Roark and colleagues use DADiSP as the core graphical display and analysis tool in their extensive data acquisition and analysis system. Their system’s architecture promises a wide application in many areas of health science. The Vocal Motor Control Laboratory (VMCL) has a capability rivalled only by two other laboratories in the world, both of which are mainframe-based.

A typical acquisition task involves attaching an array of sensors to human volunteers. These sensors record up to 16 time-synchronous physiologic measurements at a variety of sampling rates while the subject says a word or sentence. Most digital signal processing software does not permit concurrent differential sampling rates, but DADiSP does. In one session, acquired data might include eight electromyographic (EMG) signals (electrical muscle potential signals recorded by needle electrodes inserted into muscles) sampled at 5 kHz, two laryngeal kinematic signals acquired via instruments inserted through nasal or oral pathways and sampled at 20 kHz, two respiration signals sampled at 200 Hz, and a speech acoustic signal sampled at 10 kHz. Simultaneous video filming of the larynx is performed via endoscopy. Because few volunteers would want to repeat this experience, maximum integrity of the signal quality is vital.

Depending on the number of signals involved, a typical experimental session yields 100,000 bytes of digital data per second per subject. A research project might require 25 subjects (10 normal and 15 pathologic) to attend four two-hour experimental sessions. During a project, some 50 gigabytes of physiologic data are acquired and stored directly to magnetic disk. Long-term storage of data is facilitated by the use of optical media. The research team created their own data analysis program with DADiSP. It is a menu-driven, continuous linked command file organised as a relational database. Time-marking, measure extraction, and signal annotation are all automated; one system feature permits extraction of a time subset of one signal in a worksheet for viewing or editing while all other signals in the worksheet are windowed automatically according to user-selected cursors. Acquired measures are updated automatically and stored. Accumulated measures are transferred to spreadsheets for final statistical analysis and comparison.

Dr. Roark believes that there is tremendous potential for DADiSP in health science research because current health science problems require solutions that make use of sophisticated architectures and multidisciplinary cooperation. He states that the success of his research group has depended upon dedicated collaborative effort. The group consists of two electrical engineers, two medical doctors, two speech scientists, and two computer scientists. Since the team has demonstrated that sophisticated research and development tasks can be performed using computer workstations instead of large, expensive mainframe computers, the VMCL is receiving attention from research groups that have relatively small budgets for hardware and software.

DADiSP is supplied and supported in the UK and Ireland by Adept Scientific plc, Amor Way, Letchworth, Herts. SG6 1ZA; telephone +44 (0) 203 695 7810, fax +44 (0) 203 695 7819, email info@alfasoft.com; or see Adept’s World Wide Web site http://www.adeptscience.co.uk/. Adept Scientific is one of the world’s leading suppliers of software and hardware products for research, scientific, engineering and technical applications on desktop computers.

With offices in the UK, USA, Germany and throughout the Nordic region, Adept Scientific is one of the world’s leading suppliers of software and hardware products for research, scientific, engineering and technical applications on desktop computers.

DADiSP helps Jasper Engines and Transmissions, Inc. to stay ahead of the competition.

When you’re driving a few hundred miles an hour around a race track, you want to be certain your vehicle is in top shape. Your life depends on having accurate information about its condition. Mark Harrah, president of Jasper Engines and Transmissions, Inc., North Carolina, conducts research on and develops race cars for the Jasper Engine Winston Cup team, both on and off the track. It is his job to be aware at all times of the condition of the cars and drivers on his team so that they can maximise speed and minimise danger while racing in world-class competitions.

It’s not easy to calibrate a sensitive racing engine. Testing must be done while the car is on the track, so the instrumentation must be durable and portable. The sensor system used on the car must be extensive enough to pick up even the slightest anomaly, so that the vehicle can be fine-tuned to run at its best and keep the driver safe. The software used for analysing sensor data must be extremely efficient in order to handle data from almost twenty sensors. It must also provide clear display of all information to minimise errors in reading vital indicators.

Mark Harrah uses DADiSP (graphic display and data management software) to keep Jasper’s vehicles fast and safe. Mark and his Jasper team depend on DADiSP for engine development before a car is brought to the track and for testing it once it gets there. They use DADISP to analyse various chassis and engine functions on a car to determine what configurations work best.

Jasper’s on-track testing takes place on tracks at Michigan International and Daytona. A car is driven for a few laps to get baseline recordings of the relevant parameters; then one component of the engine function or chassis at a time is systematically changed. Measurements are taken which indicate how the change affects the car’s performance. Seventeen sensors are running on a car while it is on the track. A data acquisition module is used to acquire several kinds of sensor input simultaneously. After a run, the car is brought into the pits and the data are downloaded into an IBM-compatible laptop and analysed with DADiSP.

In the first part of testing, temperature data are acquired on the outer, middle, and inner surface of a car’s tyres by means of infra-red sensors in three places on each tyre. This analysis indicates the camber, castor, and toe-in of the car at different ride heights as well as in the corners of the track. DADiSP helps determine the weight distribution of the car by measuring and displaying the temperatures of the tyres. Next, RPM sensors are run on the engine and on the differential to determine the maximum and minimum RPM of the engine. Wheel RPM measurements are taken to determine proper gear ratios. Exhaust gas temperatures are measured to determine proper carburettor jetting and manifold distribution. Data are then extracted from a 3-axis accelerometer to measure longitudinal, lateral, and vertical g-forces on the car, and a throttle potentiometer is used to measure the position of the throttle. Shock sensors measure the movement of the suspension and the velocity of the shock absorber. Finally, pressure sensors are run on various parts of the car to find high and low pressure areas, especially around the induction system.

Mark Harrah says that all of these tests “just touch on the surface” of how Jasper uses DADiSP to analyse and improve their racing vehicles. “DADiSP plays a very important part in helping us to hold our own in the most competitive racing in the world. The next time you turn on the TV and see a Winston Cup race, root for the number 55 Jasper Engine car, and realise DADiSP helps us run up front.”

DADiSP is supplied and supported in the UK and Ireland by Adept Scientific plc, Amor Way, Letchworth, Herts. SG6 1ZA; telephone +44 (0) 203 695 7810, fax +44 (0) 203 695 7819, email info@alfasoft.com; or see Adept’s World Wide Web site http://www.adeptscience.co.uk/. Adept Scientific is one of the world’s leading suppliers of software and hardware products for research, scientific, engineering and technical applications on desktop computers.

With offices in the UK, USA, Germany and throughout the Nordic region, Adept Scientific is one of the world’s leading suppliers of software and hardware products for research, scientific, engineering and technical applications on desktop computers.

Diagnosing heart disease and irregularities with DADiSP

The Department of Cardiology at the Long Island Jewish Hospital specialises in the care of diseased heart patients. The hospital accommodates people with heart cardiac diseases and irregularities.

Life-threatening arrhythmia, or irregular heartbeat, affects 300,000 people per year in the United States alone. Arrhythmias vary from person to person, so a cardiologist needs as accurate a picture as possible of an individual’s arrhythmia in order to treat it correctly. Dr. Steven Evans, at the Long Island Jewish Medical Centre, heads a group that does just this kind of evaluation. His team records a patient’s heart’s electrical activity, extracts and analyses the important part of the cardiac signal, then submits it to a neural network to ascertain what type of arrhythmia the patient has. Since processing data quickly is essential when patients’ lives are in danger, it is vital for this team to have a tool that can meet sudden demands in emergencies, yet is accessible enough for several researchers to be working with it all at once.

Dr. Evans’s team uses the graphic display data processing software, DADiSP, to meet their data processing needs. Dr. Evans states, “The use of DADiSP has dramatically decreased the time spent extracting and analysing data, markedly increasing research output. Since more research means more patients helped, DADiSP is a vital part of Dr. Evans’s team.

To record the signal from an arrhythmia patient’s heart, Dr. Evans inserts a small catheter with a wire tip into the heart; an operation so exacting that it has to be done under x-ray guidance. The signal from the beating heart is recorded by an EP Lab System, a cardiac mapping system. This device digitises and displays in real time 20 channels of data from the waveforms being picked up inside the heart, stores them to optical disk, and sends them to a chart recorder which records them on paper. Only three or four of the 20 recorded channels are necessary, so these are put into a single binary file by an application supplied by Bard for this purpose and read directly into DADiSP, which is running on a 486-based personal computer.

DADiSP is used to extract and analyse relevant information from the cardiac signal. Since there are several types of arrhythmia, the analysis must yield the basic shape of a patient’s heartbeat waveform for submission to the neural network, where its precise type is determined.

To begin the analysis, DADiSP pulls apart the binary file into separate channels, then gets the peaks of each individual heartbeat using a peak detection algorithm. Each peak is used as a guide for a first-approximation extraction of the significant part of the waveform surrounding it. The first derivative of the extracted data is taken, which permits a more accurate extraction of the original signal. The amplitude of the waveform has to be normalised, a process easily accomplished with DADiSP, so that amplitude differences will not interfere with the neural network’s assessment of the overall shape. After this and several other steps, the waveform is concatenated with the rest of the extracted data to create the final data series. A long segment of cardiac electrical activity is now ready for submission to the neural network for evaluation of the type of arrhythmia present.

Dr. Evans says, “DADiSP is simplicity in itself to use.” He appreciates the power and flexibility of DADiSP’s many commands and simple command structure, and says he likes the fact that a change in one command or input parameter can enable DADiSP to accommodate a wide range of input data.

DADiSP is supplied and supported in the UK and Ireland by Adept Scientific plc, Amor Way, Letchworth, Herts. SG6 1ZA; telephone +44 (0) 203 695 7810, fax +44 (0) 203 695 7819, email info@alfasoft.com; or see Adept’s World Wide Web site http://www.adeptscience.co.uk/. Adept Scientific is one of the world’s leading suppliers of software and hardware products for research, scientific, engineering and technical applications on desktop computers.

With offices in the UK, USA, Germany and throughout the Nordic region, Adept Scientific is one of the world’s leading suppliers of software and hardware products for research, scientific, engineering and technical applications on desktop computers.

For the time being we are unable to offer the following product ranges although we are currently working hard to increase the number of products we can offer in the future. Please contact us to talk about alternative products that we may be able to offer you.